Joshua Eaton

Independent Journalist

CIA Documents Raise Questions About Spy Agency’s Domestic Data Collection

For more than two years, Americans have been reeling from revelations about the National Security Agency’s mass surveillance programs. Now, newly release documents have raised questions about whether even more of Americans’ data could be in the CIA’s hands, too.

Read the rest of this article at the Christian Science Monitor …

Bernie Sanders Campaign Rallies Drawing Enthusiastic Progressive Crowds

NASHUA, New Hampshire — Amberlee Jones was lucky to get a seat. The crowd at Nashua Community College was overflowing into the aisles as they waited to hear Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt. When he took the stage, the room grew instantly quiet. When he stepped up to the microphone after a brief introduction, the room exploded in cheers.

“I think that he has a lot of integrity. That’s incredibly important to me,” Jones, a 28-year-old sign-language interpreter from Rochester, New York, said afterward. “I don’t think that we can run our country without some sort of moral or ethical guidelines. So that’s why I’m going to vote for him.”

Sanders is trying to start what he calls a “political revolution.” An independent who identifies as socialist, Sanders is running for the presidential nomination of the Democratic Party, with which he caucuses in Congress. He has refused to take super PAC funds or run negative campaign ads. Instead, he’s taking a message of economic populism directly to voters.

Read the rest of this article at Al Jazeera America …

As Senate Rejects Cyber Bill, Privacy Trumps Security Concerns

A controversial cybersecurity bill that drew heavy criticism from privacy advocates may have been put on the backburner last week, but some observers fear that the issue may return later in the year.

The Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA) failed a procedural vote in the Senate, 40 to 56, despite bipartisan support and a heavy push by Republican leaders. It encourages organizations to monitor their networks and share “cyberthreat indicators” — which could include users’ personal data — with the intelligence community.

Read the rest of this article at Al Jazeera America …

Can Tweeters Be Tamed?

It was a simple tweet, with just a hint of edge. After police used tear gas and rubber bullets against Black Lives Matter protesters in Berkeley, Calif., on Dec. 6, Kaya Oakes, an author and lecturer who teaches writing at the University of California, Berkeley, posted a note offering students injured in the protest extra time to finish an assignment.

“If any of my #Berkeley students were teargassed, batoned, or shot w/rubber bullets last night, you can have an extension on your essay,” Ms. Oakes tweeted.

The tweet was tongue-in-cheek, according to Oakes, but it was also a show of support for what she thought was a largely peaceful protest that police met with undue force. But after conservative pundit Michelle Malkin’s Twitchy blog picked up Oakes’s tweet, it took on a life of its own. Over the course of the next two days, Oakes’s tweet showed up on the blog of Megyn Kelly at Fox News, the Fox and Friends’ Facebook page, and a local CBS affiliate.

Read the rest of this article by Harry Bruinius, to which I contributed reporting, at the Christian Science Monitor …

In Tibet, Bloggers Post at their Own Risk

These are treacherous days for anyone in China who dares to publicly criticize government policy, especially when it comes to Beijing’s handling the troubled ethnic minority regions of Tibet.

A Tibetan blogger named Druklo is one of the latest people to find that out the hard way. Druklo was arrested by Chinese police in a part of Qinghai province that Tibetans call Rebkong, according to a Tibetan friend who now lives in exile. The friend asked to remain anonymous out of concern that making their friendship public might put Druklo at greater risk.

Read the rest of this article at Public Radio International …

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